AEFP 42nd Annual Conference

Education Policy and Research in the Post-Obama Era

Marriott Wardman Park - Washington, DC
March 16-18, 2017

Board of Directors Candidates

President


Carrie Conaway


Carrie Conaway

Carrie Conaway is the chief strategy and research officer for the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, with over 15 years of experience in improving systems through evidence. She leads the agency’s Office of Planning and Research, which helps the state and districts implement effective policy and programs and make effective resource use decisions to improve student outcomes.

She has served as the agency’s principal investigator on numerous evaluations of state education programs and policy and has published two peer-reviewed articles on connecting research to practice. She led the development of the state’s top-scoring, $250 million Race to the Top proposal and managed its implementation, as well as winning several other grants to support state research, evaluation, and data use initiatives. Her team also manages the agency’s strategic planning and implementation process and builds tools that help districts benchmark their performance and deploy their resources more effectively. In January 2017 she was appointed by President Barack Obama to the National Board for Education Sciences.

Previously she was the deputy director of the New England Public Policy Center at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston and an associate editor of the Bank’s flagship publication, Regional Review. She holds a bachelor’s degree in sociology from Oberlin College; a master’s degree in policy analysis and labor policy from the Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs, University of Minnesota; and a master’s degree in sociology and social policy from Harvard University.

At Large


Rodney Andrews


Rodney Andrews
Rodney Andrews is an assistant professor of economics at The University of Texas at Dallas and research director of The Texas Schools Project. Dr.Andrews’s research primarily focuses on higher education. He has published papers on the determinants of college choice, the impact of college quality on the distribution of earnings, and the relationship between the path that students take to a bachelor's degree and subsequent earnings. His current research focuses on the effects of college recruitment/scholarship programs that target poor students, the effects of major choice, and the impact of tuition deregulation in Texas. He received his PhD in Economics from The University of Michigan.

Eric Brunner


Eric Brunner
Eric Brunner is an Associate Professor of Economics and Public Policy in the Department of Public Policy at the University of Connecticut.  His primary fields of research are state and local public finance and the economics of education.  More narrowly, much of his work has focused on issues related to the provision and financing of K-12 education, teacher labor markets, and the political economy school funding and school choice. Brunner’s work has been published in journals such as the American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, Review of Economics and Statistics, Journal of Public Economics, Journal of Urban Economics, and the National Tax Journal. He has served as an Associate Editor for the Economic of Education Review and is currently an Associate Editor for Education, Finance and Policy. He received his Ph.D. in economics from the University of California-Santa Barbara and his B.A. from the University of Connecticut. Prior to joining the faculty at the University of Connecticut, he was an Associate Professor of Economics at Georgia State University.

Stephanie Riegg Cellini


Stephanie Riegg Cellini
Stephanie Riegg Cellini is an associate professor of public policy and economics in the Trachtenberg School of Public Policy and Public Administration at The George Washington University. She is also an associate editor of Education Finance and Policy, a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research, and a nonresident senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. Her research focuses on higher education policy and the for-profit sector specifically.  Recent papers examine the labor market outcomes of for-profit college students and the impact of federal student aid on tuition.  Her work has been published in the Quarterly Journal of Economics, the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, and the American Economic Journal: Policy, among others. She received a Ph.D. in economics from the University of California, Los Angeles and a B.A. in public policy from Stanford University.

Joseph Robinson Cimpian


Joseph Robinson Cimpian
Joseph Robinson Cimpian, Ph.D. (Stanford), is an Associate Professor of Economics and Education Policy at NYU Steinhardt and affiliated faculty at NYU Wagner. His research focuses on the use and development of novel and rigorous methods to study equity and policy, particularly concerning language minorities, gender, and sexual minorities. His work has been funded by the Spencer Foundation, the AERA Grants Board, the National Science Foundation, and the Institute of Education Sciences. He is on the editorial boards of Educational Researcher, Developmental Psychology, Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, and the Journal of Research on Educational Effectiveness, and he serves on the Scholars and Advocates for Gender Equity committee for AERA. His research has been published in top journals in education, psychology, health, and policy, and has been featured by the New York Times, USA Today, Time, US News and World Report, and NPR.

Kevin Stange


Kevin Stange
Kevin Stange is an Assistant Professor of Public Policy at the Ford School of Public Policy at the University of Michigan where he teaches courses in higher education policy and quantitative methods. His research investigates the role of education policy in creating economic opportunities and narrowing inequality, spanning both K12 and postsecondary education.  He has studied college enrollment and persistence, the effect of resources and peers in community colleges, the importance of amenities in college choice, high school curriculum, and the effects of college pricing structures. He is currently conducting research on the effects of price deregulation and cost drivers in higher education, school capital investment in K12, and instructor effectiveness in for-profit higher education. His research has been published in numerous economics, education, and policy journals and supported by the U.S. Department of Education and numerous foundations. Dr. Stange holds a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of California, Berkeley.

Lori L. Taylor


Lori L. Taylor
Lori L. Taylor is an Associate Professor in the Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M University, and the Director of the school’s Mosbacher Institute for Trade, Economics and Public Policy. She also currently serves as the Principal Investigator for the Texas Smart Schools Initiative and as a member of the expert panel for the U.S. Department of Education’s “Study on the Title I Formula.” Dr. Taylor developed the National Center for Education Statistics’ Comparable Wage Index, and has written extensively on variations in the cost of education, the determinants of school district efficiency, and teacher compensation.

Government Affiliate


Darryl Hill


Darryl Hill
Darryl Hill is the assistant superintendent for school accountability and governance for the Fulton County Schools in Atlanta, Georgia. In this role, Hill supervises school account-ability, assessment, and the school governance office which includes the district's charter schools. Prior to joining Fulton County, Hill served as the director of performance strategy and analytics in the Wake County Public School System in Raleigh, NC, where he was instrumental in the development of the district's use of randomized control trials in program evaluation, as well as a focus on equity around access to advanced courses in middle and high school. Hill holds a doctorate in Education Policy, Leadership, and Instructional Practice and a master’s degree in Education Policy and Management from Harvard University in addition to an MBA, Master of Education, and bachelor’s degrees in psychology and business administration from Florida A&M University.

Thomas Wei


Thomas Wei
Thomas Wei is a senior research scientist at the U.S. Department of Education's Institute of Education Sciences (IES), where he leads IES’s Title I evaluations. He has overseen studies of the Obama Administration’s Race to the Top program and School Improvement Grants, as well as evaluations of teacher professional development and texting to reduce chronic absenteeism in low-performing schools. Dr. Wei was IES’s lead on two software tools that help practitioners use research to make better decisions about intervention costs and impacts. He is also advising the ED Office of Education Technology’s development of tools to help schools conduct rapid-cycle evaluations. Dr. Wei has published in peer-reviewed journals including Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis. An award-winning teacher, he has taught economics and public policy at Harvard and Georgetown. Dr. Wei has a B.S. from Cornell and a Ph.D. in Public Policy from Harvard.

Private/NFP Affiliate


Matthew M. Chingos


Matthew M. Chingos
Matthew M. Chingos is a senior fellow at the Urban Institute, where he studies a wide range of education-related topics at both the K–12 and postsecondary levels. Before joining Urban, Chingos was a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. He is the coauthor of Crossing the Finish Line: Completing College at America’s Public Universities and Game of Loans: The Rhetoric and Reality of Student Debt. Chingos’s work has also been published in academic journals, including the Journal of Public Economics, Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, and Education Finance and Policy. He received a B.A. in Government and Economics and a Ph.D. in Government from Harvard University.

Ben Miller


Ben Miller
Ben Miller is the Senior Director for Postsecondary Education at American Progress. He was previously the research director for higher education at New America, as well as a senior policy advisor in the Office of Planning, Evaluation and Policy Development at the U.S. Department of Education. Miller’s work focuses on higher-education accountability, affordability, and financial aid, as well as for-profit colleges and other issues. Miller’s work has appeared in The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, and the Washington Post, among other outlets. He holds a bachelor’s degree in history and economics from Brown University.