AEFP 45th Annual Conference

Toward a Meaningful Impact through Research, Policy & Practice

The Worthington Renaissance Fort Worth Hotel - Fort Worth, Texas
March 19-21, 2020

AEFP 45th Annual Conference - Candidates for Board of Directors

President Elect

Katharine Strunk
Katharine O. Strunk, is the Clifford E. Erickson Distinguished Chair in Education and a professor of education policy and, by courtesy, economics at Michigan State University. She is also the faculty co-director of the Education Policy Innovation Collaborative (EPIC). Dr. Strunk is an expert on K-12 education governance, including teachers’ unions, collective bargaining agreements, and portfolio management models, as well as teacher labor markets, school turnaround, and accountability policies. Her work has been published in highly regarded peer-reviewed journals and as policy briefs to inform policymakers and practitioners. She has worked extensively with district and state policymakers, including working with the Los Angeles Unified School District and the California and Michigan Departments of Education to help decision makers formulate, design, and revise policy. Dr. Strunk’s work has been supported by state and federal grants and contracts as well as by several philanthropic organizations. Dr. Strunk is also an associate editor and the policy brief editor of the journal Education Finance and Policy, and a member of the Executive Leadership Board for the National Center for Research on Education Access and Choice (REACH). Dr. Strunk received her PhD in Educational Administration and Policy Analysis and her MA in Economics from Stanford University, and her BA in Public Policy from Princeton University.
Katharine Strunk

At-Large Members (Three positions)

Dominique Baker
Dominique Baker is an assistant professor of education policy at Southern Methodist University. Her research focuses on the ways that public and institutional policy shape historically marginalized students’ access to and success in higher education. Baker’s current research projects examine the effects of federal accountability policy on student financial aid use, implementation of state financial aid policies, alternatives to race-conscious admissions practices, and collection of racial information in administrative data. She currently serves on the editorial board of Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis. She earned her PhD in higher education policy from Vanderbilt University and has been a member of AEFP since 2014.
Dominique Baker
Brian Jacob
Brian A. Jacob is the Walter H. Annenberg Professor of Education Policy and Professor of Economics in the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy at the University of Michigan. His primary fields of interest are labor economics, program evaluation, and the economics of education. Jacob’s research on education covers a wide variety of topics from school choice to teacher labor markets to standards and accountability. His work has appeared in top economics journals including the American Economic Review, the Quarterly Journal of Economics, and the Review of Economics and Statistics. Earlier in his career, he served as a policy analyst in the NYC Mayor's Office and taught middle school in East Harlem. He is also a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research, and a member of the editorial boards of the American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, Education Finance and Policy and the Review of Economics and Statistics. Jacob received his BA from Harvard College and his PhD from the University of Chicago. In 2008 he was awarded APPAM's David N. Kershaw Prize for Distinguished Contributions to Public Policy by Age 40.
Brian Jacob
Dave Marcotte
Dave E. Marcotte is Professor and Chair of the Department of Public Administration and Policy in the School of Public Affairs (SPA) at American University. He is also Director of SPA’s Washington Institute for Public Affairs Research. He received his Ph.D. in public policy from the University of Maryland. His research interests are mainly in the areas of educational achievement in elementary and secondary education, and access and attainment in post-secondary education. His research has been published in a wide variety of journals, including Education Finance and Policy, Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, Educational Researcher, Economics of Education Review, and Education Evaluation and Policy Analysis and is co-editor of Journal of Policy Analysis and Management. He has been a member and regular conference participant at AEFP for more than a decade and is particularly appreciative of AEFP’s role in welcoming and enriching the early careers of Ph.D. students and junior researchers.
Dave Marcotte
Margaret “Macke” Raymond
Macke Raymond is the founder and director for the Center for Research on Education Outcomes at Stanford University. Trained as a public policy analyst and have been grinding qualitative and quantitative analyses ever since. With a Ph.D. In Political Science, Macke has worked inside and outside of public agencies, consulting groups and university departments. Eager member of AEFP for many years and have been impressed with the commitment and purpose of the Board of Directors. She would be honored to serve.
Margaret “Macke” Raymond
Morgan Polikoff
Morgan Polikoff is an Associate Professor of Education Policy at the USC Rossier School of Education, where he has served since 2010. He researches standards, curriculum, accountability, and assessment policies, and his research earned him the AERA Early Career Award in 2017. He is the current co-editor of Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis and a former associate editor at the American Educational Research Journal. He co-directs the USC Rossier Center on Education Policy, Equity and Governance and founded The Answer Lab at USC Rossier. He can be found on Twitter @mpolikoff.
Morgan Polikoff
Christina Weiland
Christina Weiland is an Associate Professor at the School of Education at the University of Michigan. Her research focuses on the effects of early childhood interventions and public policies on children’s development, especially on children from low-income families. She conducts most of her work in the context of research-practice partnerships. Her work has been recognized with funding from the Institute of Education Sciences, Arnold Ventures, the Brady Foundation, and the Smith Richardson foundation (among others) and by awards from several professional organizations, including the 2018 Association for Education Finance and Policy Early Career Award. She holds a doctorate in Quantitative Policy Analysis in Education from the Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE), an M.A. in Education from HGSE, and a B.A. from Dartmouth College.
Christina Weiland

Government (One position)

Corinne Alfeld
Corinne Alfeld is a Program Officer in the Institute of Education Sciences (IES), where she monitors education research grants in several portfolios (Improving Education Systems, Career and Technical Education, Gifted Education, Postdoctoral Training, and Knowledge Use). Many of her grantees are economists conducting exploration and efficacy projects in content areas such as charter schools, CTE, gifted education, school turnaround, and changes in state education policies. Prior to joining IES, Corinne served as the Deputy Director of the National Research Center for Career and Technical Education; the Research Director for the Duke University Talent Identification Program (TIP); and the Associate Research Director for the National Institute on Work and Learning (NIWL) at FHI60. Corinne received her B.A. in psychology from Vassar College, her M.A. in developmental psychology from George Washington University, and her Ph.D. in Education and Psychology from the University of Michigan.
Corinne Alfeld
Lisa Barrow
Lisa Barrow is a Senior Economist and Research Advisor at the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago and Affiliated Researcher at the University of Chicago Consortium on School Research. Her research focuses on a variety of education issues, including the impact of attending a selective high school on student outcomes, a randomized evaluation of computer-aided algebra instruction in large urban school districts, and evaluations of performance-based scholarship impacts on academic outcomes and student time use at the college level. Her prior research on school choice, education production, and the earned income tax credit has appeared in numerous economic and policy journals. Barrow has also been a visiting assistant professor at the School of Industrial and Labor Relations at Cornell University and a visiting lecturer at the Irving B. Harris School of Public Policy at the University of Chicago. Barrow received a B.A. in economics from Carleton College and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in economics from Princeton University.
Lisa Barrow

Private/Non-Profit (One position)

Andrew McEachin
Andrew McEachin is a Policy Researcher at the RAND Corporation, and has been a member of AEFP since 2008. Stemming from his time as a special education teacher, Andrew strives to better understand the determinants of persistent educational inequalities and help policy-makers and educators make informed decisions about the design and efficacy of educational policies and programs. He has published his work in a variety of journals, including Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, Education Finance and Policy, Journal of Human Resources, Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, and Sociology of Education. He is a Co-Editor of Educational Researcher, an Associate Editor of Education Finance and Policy, and a member of the Editorial Boards of the American Educational Research Journal and Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis. Andrew is passionate about mentoring, and has prioritized mentorship through a variety of activities such as advising PhD students, collaborating on research projects, and serving on committees at RAND and AEFP. He received his PhD from the Rossier School of Education and his MA in Economics from the University of Southern California, as well as his BA in History from Cornell University.

 

Andrew McEachin
Umut Özek
Umut Özek is currently a Principal Researcher in CALDER at the American Institutes for Research. Dr. Özek’s research interests include immigrant students, implementation and consequences of educational accountability, design and effects of school choice programs, and value-added measurement. His previous research was funded by the Institute of Education Sciences, Walton Family Foundation, and Smith Richardson Foundation, and was published or is forthcoming in the Journal of Labor Economics, American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, Education Finance and Policy, Economics of Education Review, Education Evaluation and Policy Analysis, and the Journal of Public Economic Theory. Before joining the American Institutes for Research, Dr. Özek was a Research Associate at the Urban Institute. He received his Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Florida.
Umut Özek